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chicken countable or uncountable

chicken countable or uncountable

chicken countable or uncountable

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Chicken

chicken countable or uncountable
chicken countable or uncountable

The chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a domesticated subspecies of the red junglefowl originally from Southeastern Asia. Rooster or cock is a term for an adult male bird, and a younger male may be called a cockerel. A male that has been castrated is a capon. An adult female bird is called a hen and a sexually immature female is called a pullet.

Is the word chicken countable or uncountable noun?

(countable) A chicken is a bird that farmers raise for meat and eggs.

My father went out back, caught a chicken, cut off its head, and cleaned it for dinner. (uncountable) Chicken is the meat of a chicken.

Why is chicken an uncountable noun?

It means meat from a chicken, meat from a chicken, where a chicken, as we will talk about in a moment, is a bird.

So, when we use it as an uncountable noun, we use it to talk about just the meat that comes from the bird.

So this is as an uncountable noun, chicken.

Can we count chicken?

They say chicken as food is non-count in English.

Is the word chicken plural?

chicken countable or uncountable
chicken countable or uncountable

The noun chicken can be countable or uncountable. In more common, ordinarily used, contexts, the plural form will also be chicken.

Anyway, in more particular contexts, the plural form can also be chickens e.g.

in reference to all kinds of types of chickens or a collection of chickens.

Is chicken countable or uncountable noun?

The noun chicken (the creature) is a countable noun; one chicken or a dozen chickens.

The noun chicken (the food, a substance) is a mass (non-count) noun; units are expressed in pieces of chicken, parts of chicken, pounds of chicken, etc.

Words that are both countable AND uncountable

chicken

Countable: The animal

  • We have ten cows and fifteen chickens on our farm.

Uncountable: The food

  • Would you like some chicken?

paper

Countable: Individual documents

  • I showed my papers to the immigration agent.

Uncountable: Paper in general

  • I need to buy some paper – our printer is all out.

time

Countable: Specific events, moments in time

  • We’ve been to Tokyo three times.

Uncountable: The general concept of time

  • I didn’t have enough time to finish reading the book.

hair

Countable: Individual strands of hair

  • The last time I was at that restaurant, I found two hairs in my food!

Uncountable: Hair in general

  • My sister has blonde hair.

room

Countable: The specific places in a house, apartment, hotel, etc.

  • Our house has five rooms: the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, living room, and family room.

Uncountable: “Room” meaning “space” in general

  • I’ll make some room for these new books in the bookshelf.

memory

Countable: Specific memories of past events

  • I have fond memories of the volleyball games my friends and I used to play in college.

Uncountable: The ability to remember (in general)

  • I have a terrible memory. I always forget people’s names!

coffee / water / beer / tea / soda

Countable: When asking for a specific number of these drinks

  • Could you bring us three coffees with milk, and two herbal teas?

Uncountable: When talking about the drink in general

  • I drink a lot of coffee, but I don’t drink very much beer.

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

chicken countable or uncountable
chicken countable or uncountable

Chicken / fish: these are countable when we talk about the animal:

  1. My grandmother has a few chickens in her backyard.
  2. At the farm, the kids saw chickens and ducks.

Chicken / fish: these are not countable when we talk about the meat

  1. They served chicken and hotdogs at the barbecue.
  2. I eat fish twice a week.

chicken

I’m such a chicken when it comes to skiing.

Oh, and Marge will bake you a chicken pie.

But captain Alan Lee is not counting any chickens.

But foxes in chicken runs get shot, and now the Israelites get the plague.

We raise our own chickens.

A hen or stewing chicken or fowl is a mature female chicken, more than ten months old.

  • Boy, that chicken smells good
  • Put the chicken into the marinade and leave for at least 1 hour.

Make the filling: Season the chicken well with salt and pepper.

Fried chickens are counted as such if they are fried whole.

Once cut up into parts the individual pieces become uncountable like water and must have counters placed in front of them e.g. a piece or two buckets of fried chicken.

Of course, it is still technically accurate to count entire chickens after they have been fried, so long as the pieces add up to a whole chicken.

By ways of saying that you brought a fried chicken to the potluck dinner, you can accurately descrube that you have brought one whole chicken which has been cut up and fried as individual pieces.

But I question the sanity of he who really wants to spend time counting chicken parts for the sole purpose of correctly applying a obscure grammatical point.

chicken countable or uncountable
chicken countable or uncountable

A live chicken is a single indivisible unit

Once it’s killed and cooked, it becomes some quantity of fried chicken, which is divisible — and hard to keep track of, if you have light-fingered hungry people around.

HonBancho’s right; nobody wants to have to keep count.

Fried chicken is just fried chicken.

Is chicken countable?

chicken countable or uncountable
chicken countable or uncountable

chicken (countable and uncountable, plural chickens) (countable) A domestic fowl, Gallus gallus, especially when young.

(uncountable) The meat from this bird eaten as food.

(countable, slang) A coward. (countable, slang) A young or inexperienced person.

They may not even understand the different breeds or types of chickens they own.

To tell what kind of chicken you have, look at all the characteristics of the bird.

Examine the size of the chicken. Chickens come in generally two size, bantam or standard

COUNTABLE AND UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS MADE SIMPLE
  • (countable) A chicken is a bird that farmers raise for meat and eggs.
    My father went out back, caught a chicken, cut off its head, and cleaned it for dinner.
  • (uncountable) Chicken is the meat of a chicken.
    They make a very tasty fried chicken dish here that comes with vegetables and potatoes

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