curried butternut squash soup

curried butternut squash soup

curried butternut squash soup

Hello and welcome to solsarin. This post is about “curried butternut squash soup“.

Cucurbita

Cucurbita (Latin for gourd)[3][4] is a genus of herbaceous vegetables in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae (also known as cucurbits or cucurbi) native to the Andes and Mesoamerica. Five species are grown worldwide for their edible vegetable, variously known as squash, pumpkin, or gourd, depending on species, variety, and local parlance,[a] and for their seeds. Other kinds of gourd, also called bottle-gourds, are native to Africa and belong to the genus Lagenaria, which is in the same family and subfamily as Cucurbita, but in a different tribe. These other gourds are used as utensils or vessels, and their young fruits are eaten much like those of the Cucurbita species.

Most Cucurbita species are herbaceous vines that grow several meters in length and have tendrils, but non-vining “bush” cultivars of C. pepo and C. maxima have also been developed. The yellow or orange flowers on a Cucurbita plant are of two types: female and male. The female flowers produce the fruit and the male flowers produce pollen. Many North and Central American species are visited by specialist bee pollinators, but other insects with more general feeding habits, such as honey bees, also visit.

There is debate about the taxonomy of the genus, as the number of accepted species varies from 13 to 30. The five domesticated species are Cucurbita argyrosperma, C. ficifolia, C. maxima, C. moschata, and C. pepo. All of these can be treated as winter squash because the full-grown fruits can be stored for months; however, C. pepo includes some cultivars that are better used only as summer squash.

The fruits of the genus Cucurbita are good sources of nutrients, such as vitamin A and vitamin C, among other nutrients according to species. The fruits have many culinary uses including pumpkin pie, biscuits, bread, desserts, puddings, beverages, and soups.

Curried Butternut Squash Soup

How’s the weather where you are? Is it cooling down yet?

If so, I have just the thing. If not, let’s pretend it’s rainy and cold and you’re in desperate need of something soul-warming.

curried butternut squash soup
curried butternut squash soup

How does soup sound?

I’ve made a butternut squash soup before that was inspired by Tom Kha Gai. I’ve also made a Sweet Potato Coconut Curry Soup, which is on the spicier side.

But once fall hit, I couldn’t shake the idea of a curried butternut squash soup from my mind. It needed to happen.

History of Butternut Squash

Butternut squash has been around for over 5,000 years. Its exact origin is unknown, but it’s believed that the Incas grew it in central and south America during the 15th century (source).

It’s now used in many countries and cuisines throughout the world and for good reason! Not only is butternut squash versatile and delicious, but it’s rich in fiber, potassium, copper, manganese, vitamin A precursors, vitamins C, B2, B5, B6, B7, K, and more!

What is Curry Powder?

Curry powder is not a common ingredient used in traditional Indian cooking, but rather an invention of the British to evoke the flavors of Indian cuisine. The term “curry” in Indian cooking refers to a sauce or gravy served with vegetables or meat. (source)

This recipe comes together in just 30 minutes and requires simple ingredients! Isn’t that the best kind of recipe?

With fall in full swing now (at least in the Pacific Northwest), the butternut squash is abundant. I’ve started grabbing one or two every time I’m at the store. I’m becoming that lady.

But how can I resist? Butternut squash knows no bounds.

I’m smitten with this soup. It’s:

Creamy
Flavorful
Soul-warming
Subtly spiced
Coconut-infused
Simple
& Perfect for chilly weather

This soup is ideal for evenings when you want something simple and healthy. Make a batch ahead of time to have on hand for the coming week. It would also be great for entertaining and taking along to fall gatherings.

What to Serve with It?

Although it’s great on its own, I can’t help imagine how delicious this soup would be with a sandwich – especially my Chickpea Shawarma Sandwich and Chickpea Sunflower Sandwich! Serious yum.

Or for something lighter, try this 5-Minute Detox Salad or Simple Green Salad.

Thai Curried Butternut Squash Soup

Have you ever gotten to the airport only to find that your pilot has gone missing? Apparently that happens. I finally got out of Kansas City and caught a red-eye from Chicago to London (hello from Heathrow!). I only wish I’d been smart enough to pack basic toiletries and a change of clothes in my carry on. Here’s to hoping that my luggage meets me in Tel Aviv eventually.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil
  • 2 pound butternut or kabocha squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into small ½-inch pieces (about 3 cups)
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, pressed or chopped
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons Thai red curry paste*
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes (up to ¼ teaspoon for spicier soup)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 4 cups (32 ounces) vegetable broth
  • ½ cup full fat coconut milk for drizzling on top
  • ½ cup large, unsweetened coconut flakes**
  • Handful fresh cilantro leaves, chopped
curried butternut squash soup
curried butternut squash soup

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Once the oil is shimmering, add squash, onion, garlic, curry paste, coriander, cumin, salt and red pepper flakes to skillet. Stir to combine.
  2. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add broth. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until squash is soft, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  3. While the soup is cooking, toast the coconut flakes in a medium skillet over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, until fragrant and golden on the edges. Keep an eye on them so they don’t burn. Transfer coconut flakes to a bowl to cool.
  4. Once the squash mixture is done cooking, taste and add a little more Thai red curry paste if it’s not quite flavorful enough for you. Remove the soup from heat and let it cool slightly. Working in batches, transfer the contents to a blender (do not fill your blender past the maximum fill line and be careful with the hot soup!). Securely fasten the lid and use a kitchen towel to protect your hand from steam escaping from the top of the blender as you purée the mixture until smooth. Transfer puréed soup to a serving bowl and repeat with remaining batches.
  5. Stir the lime juice into the blended soup. Taste and season with additional salt if necessary. Ladle soup into individual bowls. Use a spoon to drizzle coconut milk over each bowl, then lightly swirl the spoon through the topmost layer for a pretty design. Top the soup with toasted coconut flakes and a sprinkle of chopped fresh cilantro.

NOTES

Recipe adapted from my creamy (vegan!) butternut squash linguine, How Sweet Eats’ similar soup and Simply Recipes.
IF YOU LOVE THIS RECIPE: You’ll also love my butternut chipotle chili and curried cauliflower soup.
*WHERE TO BUY THAI RED CURRY PASTE: Look for it in the Asian section of the grocery store. I like Thai Kitchen brand.
**WHERE TO BUY COCONUT FLAKES: Look for them in the baking section at Whole Foods, health food stores or well-stocked grocery stores. The brands I see most often are “Let’s Do Organic” (green package) and Bob’s Red Mill.

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