looking forward for the interview

looking forward for the interview

Hello there, Have you ever thought about this question “looking forward for the interview” Today on Solsarin we’re going to answer this question.

looking forward for the interview
looking forward for the interview

“I am looking forward to the interview” — 10 Alternatives

Are you having a hard time making a good impression in your upcoming interview at a prospective school or company?

Or, you’ve already come across the expression “I am looking forward to the interview,” but you don’t want to use it because it kind of sounds formulaic and worn-out?

Worry no more because we’ve got your back, dearest language enthusiast!

Please read our humble article covering the contextual and grammatical nuances of “I am looking forward to the interview,” as well as its alternative expressions.

What does “I am looking forward to the interview” mean?

“I am looking forward to the interview” is a commonly used statement in business English to express excitement or anticipation toward an upcoming, planned discussion. The verb in this expression can be changed into its simple present form “to look forward to” to increase its formality level. 

A grammatical perspective on “I am looking forward to the interview

“To look forward to” is a transitive phrasal verb with an idiomatic connotation that suggests feelings of excitement toward an upcoming event or activity.

Transitive verbs need to act upon a direct object that usually comes afterward. On the other hand, those that do not need a direct object are classified as intransitive verbs.

“To look forward to” comes from the base verb “to look” which is both stative and dynamic at the same time.

Stative verbs tell us about “states” rather than actual actions. Some examples of stative verbs include words that describe emotions and perceptions such as “to prefer,” “to understand,” and “to desire.”

Meanwhile, dynamic verbs demonstrate activities, accomplishments, or achievements, such as “to throw,” “to kick,” “to work,” “to study,” and “to read.”

The main difference between a stative and a dynamic verb lies upon the grammatical standard that while we can inflect the latter in its progressive or continuous form, we cannot do that with the former.

Let’s uncover the subtleties behind “I am looking forward to the interview” below.

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Formality levels behind “to look forward to”

Language register refers to the variety of formality levels that we use depending on the context in which a language is bound to operate.

In some cultures, language users are expected to use formal language when talking with people who have higher economic statuses.

While in others, age or gender may govern how formally we should communicate and interact with the members of the society.

In a more general perspective, though, we use formal language to those individuals that we perceive as authority figures, like superiors and professors.

However, we use a casual speech style to those we see as our equals or intimates, such as our family members, friends, and close colleagues.

Knowing these details would help us make sense of the series of explanations below.

I look forward to the interview

The use of the simple present tense in “I look forward to the interview” suggests the most formalistic tonality among all the examples in this section.

Also, the use of this expression could suggest that the addressee is neither an equal nor an intimate connection to the language user.

Feel free to use “I look forward to the interview” when you are applying for a job for the first time in a company where you do not know anybody at all.

Furthermore, grammatically speaking, the use of the simple present verb in “I look forward to the interview” may also suggest that the meeting is not yet scheduled or planned.

If you opt to use this tense, you are implying that you feel excited about the interview from the moment you would use the expression until it occurs in an indefinite future time.

I am looking forward to the interview

Meanwhile, “I am looking forward to the interview” contains a verb that is inflected in its present continuous tense.

The present continuous or progressive tense suggests an action that is happening continuously at the moment of speaking.

So, what do you think this tells us?

In contrast with “I look forward to the interview,” the present continuous tense suggests that the act of anticipation is only true at the moment a speaker or writer uses the expression.

Besides, the use of the progressive tense also implies that the interview is already scheduled and is expected by both parties to take place on an agreed time and date.

Hence, you can use this construction, for example, in your email response to the recruiting specialist immediately after receiving your interview schedule.

In case you would like to decrease the formality level of this expression, you may use the contracted version of your subject and linking verb or “I’m,” thereby forming “I’m looking forward to the interview.”

If you still want to make your statement even more casual, then feel free to drop your subject and linking verb and just use “Looking forward to the interview.”

10 Alternatives for “I am looking forward to the interview”

Albeit practical and free from any possibilities of misinterpretation, “I am looking forward to the interview” also contains a formulaic connotation because of its frequent use.

To do away from this, here are formal and casual substitutes for “I am looking forward to the interview.” Please choose any of the options below as you wish.

Most of the time, you would have to use a neutral to a formal tone to say “I am looking forward to the interview,” depending on the overall context of the communication.

You would need any of the alternatives below when you are corresponding with your target employers, as well as in writing cover letters.

1. I am eager to discuss my application in detail at your earliest convenience

If you feel obliged to be extremely polite yet still assertive with the potential interviewer, you may use “I am eager to discuss my application in detail at your earliest convenience.”

To comprehensively understand cover letter writing, feel free to check our full cover letter sample for waitresses with no experience as well as our barista cover letter.

Example:

I am eager to discuss my application in detail at your earliest convenience. Please feel free to contact me via email with any concerns. You may also reach me directly through my mobile number for any urgent matters.

2. I am eagerly anticipating the interview

But, if you want to keep your interest in the interview shorter, yet still assertive and formal at once, you may use “I am eagerly anticipating the interview” instead.

The next example is something you would notice in an email response to a scheduled interview confirmation, which is likely coming from the recruitment team.

3. I am eagerly awaiting the interview

“I am eagerly awaiting the interview” is also another great formal way to express your enthusiasm toward a confirmed and scheduled interview.

4. I am looking forward to speaking with you

“I am looking forward to speaking with you” is also another excellent way to convey your excitement towards an upcoming conversation, such as an interview.

Because this expression is clear and, therefore, free from ambiguities, anyone using this is formal correspondence should be able to leave a professional impression on the addressee.

5. I am looking forward to talking with you

If you feel like reducing the formality level of “speaking” a little bit, then conveniently choose “I am looking forward to talking with you” instead.

6. I look forward to seeing you on Monday/next week/tomorrow

Alternatively, you may also simply express your interest in an interview by saying “I look forward to seeing you on Monday/next week/tomorrow” to your potential interviewer.

7. I look forward to the interview on (interview date)

Including the date of your interview is a good way to tell your potential employer that you are fully aware of your interview details.

This would show that you have completely understood the confirmation message given to you by the prospective employer.

8. I look forward to having the interview on (interview date)

Another way to convey your enthusiasm politely in an interview is by using “I look forward to having the interview on” followed by the interview date.

“To having the interview,” the direct object, suggests that you are excited about “experiencing the interview” in the future.

9. I would love to have the interview at your earliest convenience

In case you get asked to choose from several interview schedules by the employer, you may respond by saying “I would love to have the interview at your earliest convenience.”

10. I would love to have the opportunity to share more details during the interview

Last but not least, “I would love to have the opportunity to share more details during the interview” would be a great choice for a cover letter conclusion.

Not only does this sound polite and formal, but this also works as a call-to-action prompt to your possible employer, enticing them through your excitement about undergoing an interview.

Thanks for your supports.

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