which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?

which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?

which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?

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which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?
which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?

which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed quizlet

The operation on a PWC that will require more than idle speed is steering control.

PWC may not be operated between sunset and sunrise.

PWC must be operated in a reasonable and prudent manner.

A PWC, operating at more than idle speed, may not run around, ride or jump the wake of, or be within 100 feet of another moving boat or PWC unless it is overtaking the other boat in compliance with the rules for encountering other boats. When a PWC is overtaking another boat, it must not change course to ride or jump the wake of the boat being overtaken.

A PWC must be operated at idle speed if within 100 feet of a:

Vessel not underway or adrift

Dock, pier, or bridge

Person(s) in the water

Shoreline adjacent to a residence

Public park or beach or a swimming area

Marina, a restaurant, or any other public-use area

It is illegal to rent, lease, or let for hire a PWC to a person under the age of 16 years.

which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed boated

PWC must be operated in a reasonable and prudent manner. A PWC, operating at more than idle speed, may not run around, ride or jump the wake of, or be within 100 feet of another moving boat or PWC unless it is overtaking the other boat in compliance with the rules for encountering other boats.

 which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed avoiding erosion

Personal Water Craft

Recent History

Personal Water Craft (PWC) have become a major force in boating over the last few years, now accounting for over 1/3 of new boat sales annually. There are about one MILLION PWCs in use today.

which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?
which operation on a pwc requires more than idle speed?

That is a huge number of boats, and unfortunately there is an equal amount of misunderstanding to go along with them. Did you know that a PWC was even considered a boat? Many people don’t, and think of them more as toys that require no training or knowledge of how they work. To start, think of the terms used for a boat – they will be the same for a PWC.

only one person…

When PWCs first came on the market, they were generally designed for only one person and were designed for high maneuverability. They were usually only available as stand-up models, and had few features.

Over the last several years, two, three and even four seat models have become the top sellers. These craft are much more substantial than earlier craft, and are even capable of pulling a water skier. Today’s models generally come with a good deal of storage space for gear, and have a very traditional “dashboard” with gauges. Remember, your PWC operator’s manual will tell you the specifics of your boat, including tips on safe operation, and how many people you can safely carry.

What they are

 

Personal Water Craft are considered by the Coast Guard to be Class A inboard motor vessels and as such must adhere to the same Coast Guard regulations and standards as any other powerboats in this category, such as they must have a fire extinguisher on board, and must have an appropriate sound signaling device such as a horn or athletic whistle.

They are also subject to USCG manufacturing and load capacity standards, which may be found on the capacity plate and in the owners manual.

They must be registered with the state, and must also obey the Nautical Rules of the Road.

Even though PWCs are considered to be boats, there are a few differences that you need to know.

Virtually no PWCs have running lights as all manufacturers recommend that they only be used during daylight. In fact, many states ban the use of PWCs at night.

Many states require that Personal Floatation Devices be worn at all times while on a PWC. Many states also regulate the operation of personal watercraft within their borders by prohibiting them from specified lakes and boating areas, or by placing geographic or time restrictions on their use.

Some states require an adult to be on board when a minor is operating the craft, or may require completion of a boating safety course before a minor can legally operate a PWC.

Pre-ride Inspection

It is always a great idea to check your watercraft prior to every outing. This will allow you to make sure that your watercraft is in top operating condition. Some things to check are:

  1. Battery – Make sure that your battery is fully charged, and all electrical wires are properly connected, tight, and not frayed.
  2. Controls – Make sure all operating controls are working properly – steering controls, stop button, lanyard cut-off, and throttle.
  3. Drain Plug – drain your bilge – and be sure your plug is properly secured before launching.
  4. Engine – Check your engine – fluid levels, hose connections, oil level/leaks, and finally make sure the engine compartment cover is properly secured.
  5. Fuel – Make sure that you don’t have fuel leaks, and fill the tank. Plan on using 1/3 of your gas to get there, 1/3 to get back, and keep 1/3 as a reserve. Many PWCs are equipped with a fuel selector or reserve switch to help you avoid running out of fuel. If you run out of fuel, switch the tank setting to “reserve” and go to the dock. Don’t forget to reset the switch once you’ve filled up again.
  6. Hull – Check the outside of your PWC–check for hull damage, check the jet pump cover and inlet for damage/fit, and secure the seats.

Boat

A boat is a watercraft of a large range of types and sizes, but generally smaller than a ship, which is distinguished by its larger size, shape, cargo or passenger capacity, or its ability to carry boats.

resource: wikipedia

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