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who is the lead singer of the cure?

who is the lead singer of the cure?

who is the lead singer of the cure?

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who is the lead singer of the cure?
who is the lead singer of the cure?

s the lead singer of the cure?

Facing many challenges since the beginning of their career, The Cure managed to remain one of the most popular bands in the history of rock music. The band’s frontman Robert Smith has been the only constant part of The Cure which experienced many changes considering both its name and lineup.

The story of The Cure started when the middle school friends Robert Smith, Michael Dempsey, Laurance Tolhurst, Marc Ceccagne, and Alan Hill formed a school band named Obelisk in 1973. A couple of years later, they founded another band called Malice and started playing songs from Jimi Hendrix and David Bowie, which later became Easy Cure.

Until the 1980s, the band’s lineup changed many times except for Robert Smith. In 1978, Smith renamed the band as The Cure and released their debut single titled ‘Killing an Arab.’ However, the single received criticism as well as acclaim mainly due to its racist connations. The Cure became a significant part of the punk rock and new wave movements especially with the release of their debut album, ‘Three Imaginary Boys.’

After the release of their second studio album, ‘Seventeen Seconds,’ The talented lead singer Robert Smith’s unique stage look and the band’s dark style developed in time and brought The Cure closer to the gothic rock genre. Throughout their career, The Cure has released 13 studio albums and achieved to sell more than 30 million records around the world. Although they had to overcome many challenges to continue making their music, The Cure members managed to obtain a significant amount of wealth.

Robert Smith Net Worth $25 Million

 

The Cure’s co-founder, lead singer, and primary songwriter, Robert Smith has a net worth of $25 million which makes him the wealthiest member of the band.

Smith started his music career while he was only 14 years old by forming a band called the Crawley Goat Band with his siblings and his friends from school. However, his school band called The Obelisk became the foundation of what would have been The Cure. Even though Robert didn’t have the intention to be the frontman of the band, he later had to take the role of being the band’s lead singer mainly due to the several lineup changes in The Cure leaving Smith the only constant member of the band.

In addition to his guitar playing and exceptional stage look, Robert became quite popular with his successful songwriting skills which proved itself in The Cure’s hit songs, such as ‘The Love Cats, ‘Let’s Go To Bed,’ and ‘The Walk.’ Besides The Cure, he shortly performed with the bands Siouxsie and the Banshees, and The Glove.

Simon Gallup Net Worth $20 million

who is the lead singer of the cure?
who is the lead singer of the cure?

The bass player of The Cure, Simon Gallup, is the second-richest member of the band with his net worth of $20 million which is quite less than Robert Smith’s net worth of $25 million.

Gallup joined The Cure a couple of years after its foundation to replace their original bassist Michael ‘Mick’ Dempsey. Almost two years later, Simon decided to leave The Cure following a fight between him and Robert Smith during the band’s Pornography Tour.

Only two years later, Smith offered Gallup to rejoin the band which he accepted by burying the hatches with his old friend. In 1922, the bassist had to take another break from his music career with The Cure due to a health issue. Simon has also collaborated with Lockjaw, The Mag/Spys, and Fools Dance.

‘Love’ story: The Cure’s ‘Disintegration’ and Robert Smith’s romance, 30 years later

Thirty years ago this week, on May 2, 1989, the Cure released the magnum opus that Kyle from South Park once rightfully declared “the best album EVER!” While the Cure’s epic eighth studio effort, Disintegration, was among the band’s gloomiest and doomiest (frontman Robert Smith always considered it an unofficial companion to 1982’s intensely, brutally dark Pornography), it ironically yielded the band’s sweetest — and most commercially successful — single, “Lovesong.”

The Cure broke out of the post-punk underground in the mid-’80s with The Head on the Door and their double-disc follow-up, Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. But it was 1989’s Disintegration — the culmination of all of Smith’s stylistic experiments, simultaneously gorgeous and raw, melancholy and exuberant, grandiose and intimate — that transformed the Cure into stadium headliners. After slugging it out with a revolving Cure lineup since 1976, Robert Smith — with his spidery hair and trademark smeared scrawl of crimson lipstick — had somehow become one of music’s most unlikely and reluctant rock stars.

And all along the way, a girl named Mary Poole, who inspired “Lovesong” and soon after that became Mrs. Smith, had been by Robert’s side.

Smith met Mary Poole when he was just 14 years old at St. Wilfrid’s Comprehensive School in Crawley, England, when he drummed up the nerve to ask her to be his partner in a drama-class project. “I just struck lucky early on,” he told The Guardian in 2004. According to an interview he conducted with the publication Lime Lizard in 1991, it was Mary’s lack of confidence in his future as a musician that instilled in Smith the drive to make the Cure (originally the Easy Cure) successful. And almost 15 years after they met, a very successful Robert penned “Lovesong” as his wedding present for Mary. The two exchanged vows on Aug. 13, 1988, and are still together, their rock ‘n’ roll marriage bucking the odds and showing no signs of, well, disintegrating.

THE CURE’S ROBERT SMITH IS WORTH A LOT MORE THAN YOU THINK
Gareth Davies/Getty Images
BY PAULI POISUO/JUNE 25, 2020 10:48 AM EST
Depending on your outlook, The Cure’s Robert Smith is either the most or least likely rock star out there. For goths, he’s up there with the likes of Nick Cave, and possibly even higher. For others, his frumpy, backcombed mane of hair, dark clothing, smeared lipstick and heavy eye makeup can make him stand out even in the notoriously eccentric world of rock star fashion. Still, few can deny the man’s vast contributions to the world of music. From “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Pictures of You” to “Lullaby” and “Disintegration,” The Cure’s fare is often full of darkness under their surprisingly poppy tunes, which you’ve almost certainly heard even though you might not immediately associate them with the band.

Messed Up Things That Happened At Woodstock
All of this has been more than enough to earn The Cure and Robert Smith a significant following over the years, and though the singer’s name recognition might not be quite up there with Axl Rose or Mick Jagger, he has done very well for himself. In fact, The Cure’s Robert Smith may very well be worth more than you think.

ROBERT SMITH IS WORTH A COOL $25 MILLION

Jamie Mccarthy/Getty Images
Robert Smith does not exactly dress like a millionaire. In fact, one might think that he looks a bit like he still raids his mom’s makeup drawer and shops at Goodwill — but then again, that’s his style, and far be it from us to cramp it. After all, it’s not like Smith comes to our house and tells us how to look.

In reality, of course, Smith has been the sole consistent member of The Cure since the band’s inception in 1978, which means he has over four decades of various degrees of rock star success under his belt. As such, he might be one of the world‘s foremost purveyors of Gothic doom and gloom, but his bank account should give him no reason to feel down … at least, according to wealth estimation site Celebrity Net Worth, which guesstimates Smith’s earthly possessions at a very respectable $25 million.

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Musicians, being a volatile, emotional, damaged, and creative lot, understandably have spats with each other over a ton of petty crap most people wouldn’t stew over for more than a second. But, while most beefs end up quickly squashed once said beefers realize how childish they’re acting, some musician feuds spiral completely out of control and last forever. Here are a few that, if the combatants had to go to their room until they cooled off, they would likely die and be buried there instead.

 

PRINCE VS. MICHAEL JA CKSON

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From the outside, this one just looked like two pop icons jostling for world domination. Prince’s For You heralded his arrival in 1978, a year before Jackson’s Off the Wall put him on the map as a solo artist. Prince’s 1999 and MJ’s record-demolishing Thriller were released within a month of each other in 1982, with Jackson basically reigning supreme for a while as our benevolent moonwalking pop overlord. Prince’s Purple Rain was next, and Jackson reportedly attended a number of Prince’s tour dates at the time to suss this purple guy out.

who is the lead singer of the cure?
who is the lead singer of the cure?

And that was just the music. The full story was a much more complicated, bitter, and wonderfully weird affair. After a particularly heated game of ping-pong in 1985, the victorious Prince compared Jackson to Helen Keller as he left the room. In a recently surfaced audio interview from 1988, Jackson called him “one of the rudest people [he’d] ever met” and ridiculed him for falling off the stage during their 1983 on-stage collaboration with James Brown. When Jackson sought to collaborate with Prince on “Bad,” according to Pop Matters, Prince mockingly sent him a song called “Wouldn’t U Love to Love Me” in response. Prince was also offered a role in the “Bad” video — as the rival gang member ultimately played by Wesley Snipes — and refused because of the potential implications of that opening line: “Your butt is mine.

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