Collingwood Monument

Collingwood Monument

Collingwood Monument

Hello dear friends, thank you for choosing us. In this post on the solsarin site, we will talk about “Collingwood Monument”.
Stay with us.
Thank you for your choice.

Collingwood Monument
Collingwood Monument

Collingwood Monument

Erected by public subscription in 1845, this Grade II*

Listed monument was sculpted in marble and sandstone by John Graham Lough and stands on top of a pedestal designed by well-known, local architect John Dobson.

The position of the monument marks Collingwood’s family connection with North Shields .

(members of his family lived close by at Chirton, North Shields).

and allows the statue to be seen from the sea and the river.

The four cannons flanking the steps came from the flagship Royal Sovereign .

Cuthbert Collingwood joined the Royal Navy

and were added in 1848. Born in Newcastle in 1748, Cuthbert Collingwood joined the Royal Navy in 1761. On-board the frigate Shannon.

commanded by his uncle, Captain (afterwards Admiral) Braithwaite, he learned the rudiments of seamanship.

The American War of Independence and then the Napoleonic War pitched him into a number of victorious encounters and he rose swiftly through the naval ranks with his friend Horatio Nelson.

whom he had met in Jamaica in 1772 whilst they were both midshipmen. Though remaining fond of his North East roots.

Collingwood never returned to his family in Morpeth after the Battle of Trafalgar. He died at sea near Menorca in 1810 and was later buried in St. Paul’s Cathedral beside Nelson.

collingwood monument tynemouth

Standing overlooking the River Tyne at Tynemouth is the imposing Collingwood Monument. Finding your way here can be a little tricky, but it is thoroughly worth the slight effort involved.

The secret is to look out for a path leading diagonally upwards from the nearby car park:

our own efforts to follow the shore around from the actual mouth of the River Tyne were not successful.

Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood, lived from 26 September 1748 to 7 March 1810. He was the son of a Newcastle merchant. At the age of twelve, he went to sea as a volunteer on board the frigate HMS Shannon under the command of his cousin Captain (later Admiral) Richard Braithwaite.

READ more and know more:D  how many major titles has pete sampras won

In June 1775 he fought at the battle of Bunker Hill during the siege of Boston.

and on the same day was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Royal Navy. Collingwood served alongside Nelson two years later, and in 1779 succeeded him as captain of HMS Badger.

Collingwood was promoted to vice-admiral

The careers of the two men had a lot in common as both worked their way up the naval hierarchy during the 1780s and 1790s. Collingwood was promoted to vice-admiral in 1804.

and at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805 was second in command of the British fleet under Admiral Nelson.

While Nelson was on board HMS Victory at the head of one half of the fleet that day, Collingwood was on board HMS Royal Sovereign, which was the first British ship to engage.

After Nelson was fatally wounded, Collingwood took command of the British fleet as they defeated their French and Spanish counterparts. On 9 November 1805 Collingwood was raised to the peerage as Baron Collingwood, of Caldburne and Hethpool in the County of Northumberland.

Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet in 1805

Collingwood became Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet in 1805. His health subsequently declined, and Collingwood died on 7 March 1810 while en route back to England for medical leave.

He was laid to rest besides his close friend Nelson in the crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral. Collingwood is by far the less well known of the two, but in many eyes he was as accomplished a naval commander as Nelson, and his memory lives on in the North East of England,

not least through the presence of the enormous Collingwood Monument, built here in 1847.

it is seems unclear

Just how enormous it is seems unclear, as none of the usual references reveal the size of the overall monument.

They do however reveal that the actual statue of Collingwood which stands on top of it is 23ft tall, and scaling from photographs suggests that the square tower it stands on is, with the steps at it foot.

READ more and know more:D  how many major titles has bj√∂rn borg won?

some 60ft in height, while the massive box-like plinth at the foot of the monument adds a further 20ft. This gives an overall height for the monument of just over 100ft.

Collingwood Monument
Collingwood Monument

and it is made all the more imposing by a location on ground rising from the River Tyne below.

The steps up the front of the monument are flanked by four cannons from HMS Royal Sovereign.

Lord Collingwood Monument

Collingwood Monument, Tynemouth, Tyne and Wear

Statue of Admiral Collingwood built to commemorates his success at Trafalgar with Nelson. He played a pivotal role in the battle as Nelson’s ‘right-hand’ man. He commanded the ship the Royal Sovereign.

The statue was built in 1845 by public subscription. Collingwood was born in Newcastle and members of his family lived at Chirton, North Shields. The statue was deliberately sited to be seen from the sea and the river.

lord collingwood monument

The Collingwood Monument was built in 1845 in honour of Admiral Lord Collingwood, who led the British Fleet to victory at the Battle of Trafalgar after the death of Nelson, saving Britain from likely invasion during the Napoleonic Wars.

The statue was sculpted by John Graham Lough, standing on a pedestal designed by John Dobson.

The prominent position of the monument means the statue can be seen from the sea and the River Tyne, and marks Collingwood’s family connection with North Shields.

The 4 cannon on the steps of the monument came from his flagship, the Royal Sovereign.

Details

TYNEMOUTH PIER ROAD (west side, off) NZ 3769 SW Tynemouth 10/108 24.10.50 Collingwood Monument and guns. G.V. II* Monument, 1845; guns added 1848. Base and plinth by Dobson; statue by Lough. Sandstone ashlar and marble. High wide base, with slit openings in returns and door in rear. Stepped side walls to wide flight of steps. Base and high pedestal for colossal figure of Admiral Collingwood in draped cloak. Plaque on south side of base commemorates his success at Trafalgar under Nelson and the erection by public subscription of this memorial. 4 guns on walls flanking steps came from his ship, the Royal Sovereign. Historical note: Collingwood was born in Newcastle and members of his family lived at Chirton, North Shields. The statue was sited to be seen from the sea and the river.

READ more and know more:D  percentage of water in human body weight

Listing NGR: NZ3718169069

Collingwood Monument
Collingwood Monument

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number:
303354
Legacy System:
LBS

Legal

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

collingwood statue tynemouth

Admiral Collingwood

Collingwood Monument, Tynemouth, Tyne and Wear. Statue of Admiral Collingwood built to commemorates his success at Trafalgar with Nelson. He played a pivotal role in the battle as Nelson’s ‘right-hand’ man.

Images of England

Images of England was a photographic record of every listed building in England, created as a snap shot of listed buildings at the turn of the millennium. These photographs of the exterior of listed buildings were taken by volunteers between 1999 and 2008. The project was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Collingwood Monument

The Collingwood Monument is a Grade II* listed[1][2] monument in Tynemouth, England, dedicated to Vice Admiral Lord Cuthbert Collingwood. A Napoleonic-era admiral noted for being second-in-command to Admiral Lord Nelson during the Battle of Trafalgar, Collingwood is sometimes referred to as the forgotten hero of Trafalgar.[3][4] The monument’s base is by John Dobson and the statue is a work of the sculptor John Graham Lough. It is situated just off of Front Street in Tynemouth and overlooks the mouth of the River Tyne.[2]

resource: wikipedia

Collingwood Monument
Collingwood Monument

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *