pomodoro sauce vs marinara sauce

pomodoro sauce vs marinara sauce

pomodoro sauce vs marinara sauce

Hello dear readers. In this post on Solsarin we are going to talk about ”pomodoro sauce vs marinara sauce“. Continue reading to find the answer. please write your comment, Thank you for your attention.

Marinara is runnier and more liquidy than pomodoro, but it’s also a chunkier sauce. You cut tomatoes when making marinara, but mince them when preparing pomodoro. Pomodoro is thick and smooth; marinara is runny and chunky. (Either one of these can also be considered a pasta sauce or spaghetti sauce, though the latter term usually implies even more ingredients, including meat and additional vegetables. And then there are more specific versions, like ragu and Bolognese sauce—but that’s for another day. Smoother, thicker pomodoro is often used as pizza sauce.)

"<yoastmark

The other big differences between pomodoro and marinara sauce are their colors and cook times. Since marinara simmers for a shorter period of time, it keeps more of its bright red and orange hues. Pomodoro, on the other hand, can simmer slowly for hours, resulting in a deeper, darker red (although in the interest of saving you time, many of the recipes listed below only take 30 minutes!).

And now you know the difference between these two very close cousins on the red sauce family tree. But while a good sauce is the key to a great dish, it can’t do all the work.

Pomodoro and Marinara Sauce Recipes

The possibilities are seemingly endless, but we’ve rounded up a few of the most mouth-watering dishes we could find. Enjoy! And whatever you decide, think twice before putting on that white shirt.

Easy Pomodoro Sauce

This Easy Pomodoro Sauce is the perfect recipe to have on hand. Smoothly textured and thick with deliciously fresh ingredients, this tomato-based sauce is perfect with so many dishes. While it’s traditionally used over pasta, you can also repurpose it for things other than pasta. This Pomodoro sauce recipe can easily be made to work with meals throughout the week, making dinner prep so much easier. Flavorful and fragrant, it is easy to make and store. You’re going to love how convenient this yummy sauce is.

What is it made of?

This Pomodoro sauce is made with fresh, flavorful ingredients. For this recipe, you will need Extra virgin olive oil, Garlic cloves, Yellow onion, a can of Whole peeled tomatoes, Sugar, Kosher salt, and Basil leaves.

MORE POSTS:

Pomodoro Sauce vs Marinara

Pomodoro sauce may have similar ingredients to marinara, but the big difference is in their textures. Marinara is more liquid and runnier, and it is often chunky. Pomodoro is thicker and smoothly textured.

What is the Difference between Pomodoro and Bolognese Sauces?

A bolognese means “meat sauce,” so for this sauce, the meat is the center focus. For a pomodoro sauce, the tomatoes are the star. So the main difference between them is that the bolognese has meat and the pomodoro doesn’t.

"<yoastmark

 

What is the Difference between Pomodoro and Bolognese Sauces?

A bolognese means “meat sauce,” so for this sauce, the meat is the center focus. For a pomodoro sauce, the tomatoes are the star. So the main difference between them is that the bolognese has meat and the pomodoro doesn’t.

What texture to look for

Pomodoro sauce isn’t really chunky; it’s thicker. The ingredients are minced and cut small so that the sauce has a smooth texture, though it’s not thin or liquidity as marinara is. This is because it is not made with tomato paste or sauce, but rather with pureed tomatoes.

How to make it

  1. Prep the onion and garlic. Chop half a yellow onion and mince the garlic cloves.
  2. Cook them. Place the minced garlic and onion in a pan with extra virgin olive oil. Over medium heat, stir the ingredients until the onion turns translucent.
  3. Blend the tomatoes. In a blender, pulse the whole peeled tomatoes until they are pureed, about 5 pulses.
  4. Add the tomatoes. Pour the pureed tomatoes into the pan and stir over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes.
  5. Season the sauce. Add the sugar, salt, and basil leaves. Cook for another 5 minutes and then serve hot.

The difference between pomodoro and marinara

Let’s start with their ingredients. While there are plenty of variations (some recipes call for oregano, stewed tomatoes, and thyme, to name a few), the *essential* ingredients for a good marinara include: fresh tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, fresh basil, and salt. And while some recipes call for a few additions, like red onion or carrot, the basic ingredients are the same for pomodoro sauce: tomatoes, garlic, basil, olive oil, and salt. So, again, “What’s the difference?” you may ask. Consistency, for one.Save

Marinara is runnier and more liquidy than pomodoro, but it’s also a chunkier sauce. You cut tomatoes when making marinara, but mince them when preparing pomodoro. Pomodoro is thick and smooth; marinara is runny and chunky. (Either one of these can also be considered a pasta sauce or spaghetti sauce, though the latter term usually implies even more ingredients, including meat and additional vegetables. And then there are more specific versions, like ragu and Bolognese sauce—but that’s for another day. Smoother, thicker pomodoro is often used as pizza sauce.)

The other big differences between pomodoro and marinara sauce are their colors and cook times. Since marinara simmers for a shorter period of time, it keeps more of its bright red and orange hues. Pomodoro, on the other hand, can simmer slowly for hours, resulting in a deeper, darker red (although in the interest of saving you time, many of the recipes listed below only take 30 minutes!).Save

And now you know the difference between these two very close cousins on the red sauce family tree. But while a good sauce is the key to a great dish, it can’t do all the work.

"<yoastmark

What Tomatoes Are Best for Pomodoro Sauce?

There’s a broad spectrum of tomatoes out there; some are great for snacking off the vine or used raw in salad, and some are better suited to stand up to heat and make for a great sauce.

  • San Marzano Tomatoes: Deep red, plum tomatoes grown in the Campania region are among the world’s best for sauce making. They have a sweet flavor, dense pulp, and low acidity that make them desirable for homemade tomato sauce and tomato paste. They are conveniently available canned, which will help cut down your prep time.
  • Roma Tomatoes: A plum Italian tomato with a meaty interior and very few seeds, these tomatoes boil down faster than other tomatoes. They also have more flesh and less liquid, which makes them a great choice for sauces and canning.
  • Amish Paste Tomatoes: An heirloom paste tomato from Wisconsin similar to Roma tomatoes, but are sweeter and brighter in flavor.
  • Italian Gold Tomatoes: Yellow, pear-shaped tomatoes that are high in pectin, making them nice and thick for sauces.

 

"<yoastmark

6 Pastas to Serve With Pomodoro Sauce

Technically, there isn’t a wrong choice when it comes to making pasta pomodoro, but you’ll find that certain shapes of pasta pair better with certain sauces. Here’s a quick guide to help you decide.

  • Spaghetti: This is the classic go-to for pasta with tomato sauce. Long, thin, and cylindrical, it can hold up to almost any sauce. Learn how to make fresh spaghetti here.
  • Linguine: Long, thin flat strips of pasta that resemble flattened spaghetti.
  • Farfalle: Bow tie pastas contain small folds that help hold more sauce.
  • Gnocchi: These small, soft dumplings are perfect for pairing with rich tomato sauces. Learn Chef Thomas Keller’s recipe for potato gnocchi here.
  • Ravioli: Squared pieces of dough filled with cheese, meat, or veggies work well with bright tomato sauces, providing a nice contrast in flavors.
  • Gluten-Free Pasta: A healthy option for pasta, you’ll find these in almost any shape and size. Popular gluten-free pastas are made from brown rice, chickpeas, and quinoa.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *